Promoting Justice /
Protecting Rights

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Criminal Justice
14
Jan

Shanaghan family responds to Police Ombudsman’s statement on ‘Operation Greenwich’

The family of Patrick Shanaghan has responded to the Police Ombudsman’s statement on ‘Operation Greenwich’, welcoming some aspects of the report, while criticising its limitations. Operation Greenwich relates to a series of murders and attempted murders committed across several counties between 1988 and 1994, including the 1991 murder of Patrick Shanaghan. CAJ represents the family...
15
Dec

UK Supreme Court quashes ‘irrational’ PSNI decision not to further investigate allegations UK Ministers authorised the use of torture in the ‘Hooded Men’ cases

The UK Supreme Court has found that the decision of the PSNI not to investigate an allegation that senior UK government ministers authorised the use of torture in the ‘Hooded Men’ cases was “irrational and falls to be quashed”. The judgment follows a judicial review challenge taken by CAJ on behalf of Mary McKenna, the...
11
Oct

PSNI@20: Human Rights Reflections on Policing Reform North and South

A joint seminar from ICCL and CAJ to reflect on policing reform on the island of Ireland, featuring a range of expert speakers. When: 9.30am to 1.30pm Friday 5 November 2021 Where: Great Hall, QUB, BT7 1NN Police reform and oversight has been an essential pillar of the NI peace process from the 1990s onwards....
14
Jun

‘Hooded Men’ appeal to be heard in the UK Supreme Court

From 14 to 16 June 2021, the UK Supreme Court will hear an appeal from Northern Ireland in relation to the treatment of the ‘Hooded Men’.  The case is being taken by Mary McKenna, daughter of one of the Hooded Men, Sean McKenna. Mr McKenna, after release from internment, spent the rest of his life...
16
Dec

MI6 unilaterally assumed power to break law on UK soil, tribunal reveals

At the Investigatory Powers Tribunal today, it was revealed that MI6 may have unilaterally assumed the power to authorise agents to commit crimes in the UK  – potentially without any legal basis or limits on the crimes they can commit. Reprieve, the Pat Finucane Centre, Privacy International, and CAJ have been challenging a secret policy...
14
Oct

Written evidence to the Joint Committee on Human Rights on the Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill

The Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill was introduced to the UK Parliament on 24 September 2020, and is scheduled to complete passage through the House of Commons by 15 October 2020. The Bill will amend existing legislation to create a new process of ‘Criminal Conduct Authorisations’, which will allow MI5, police forces, and a range...
01
Oct

Briefing for Second Reading of the Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill

The Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill was introduced on 24 September 2020, with its Second Reading scheduled for 5 October 2020. The Bill will amend existing legislation to create a new process of ‘Criminal Conduct Authorisations’, which will allow MI5, police forces, and a range of other public authorities to authorise their agents...
24
Sep

New law lets MI5 authorise crimes with no hard limits

A joint press release from CAJ, Reprieve, Privacy International, and the Pat Finucane Centre. Agents of MI5 and other Government bodies could be legally authorised to commit crimes under new legislation introduced today. There appear to be no express limits in the legislation on the types of crime which could be authorised. The Covert Human...
22
Sep

Written Evidence from the Model Bill Team to the Human Rights (Joint Committee) on the Overseas Operations (Service Personnel and Veterans) Bill

This submission was prepared by the ‘Model Bill Team’, which is comprised of experts from CAJ and Queen’s University Belfast. The team has produced a range of technical briefings and reports designed to help inform public debates on dealing with the past in Northern Ireland. Their new submission highlights how the draft Overseas Operations (Service...
27
Jul

MI6 apologise for asking court staff to withhold evidence from Judges in case about crimes by covert agents

MI6 has been forced to apologise to the Investigatory Powers Tribunal after two of its officers asked court staff to return documents relating to MI6’s use of agents and not show them to judges. The Tribunal suggested MI6’s actions were “inappropriate interference”. The revelation emerged in an ongoing legal case considering what crimes intelligence informants...
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